Using Abusive Language Can't Be The Accepted Norm Of The Indian Society?

Using Abusive Language Can't Be The Accepted Norm Of The Indian Society?

Why Youngsters Think Using Abuse Words Sound Cool in Public

Abuse words are words that are used to insult, humiliate, or hurt someone verbally. They can be swear words, slurs, or derogatory terms that target someone's identity, appearance, or behavior. Abuse words are often considered rude, vulgar, or offensive by most people, but some youngsters may use them frequently in public settings. Why do they do that? Here are some possible reasons:

- They want to fit in with their peers. Some youngsters may use abuse words because they hear them from their friends, celebrities, or media. They may think that using abuse words is a way of showing their loyalty, belonging, or coolness to their social group. They may also fear being rejected or ridiculed if they don't use abuse words like others do.
- They want to express their emotions. Some youngsters may use abuse words because they are angry, frustrated, or sad. They may think that using abuse words is a way of venting their feelings or getting attention from others. They may also lack the skills or vocabulary to express their emotions in more constructive ways.
- They want to challenge authority. Some youngsters may use abuse words because they are rebellious, defiant, or bored. They may think that using abuse words is a way of showing their independence, power, or creativity to the adults or rules that they dislike. They may also enjoy the thrill or shock value of using abuse words in public.
- They don't realize the impact of their words. Some youngsters may use abuse words because they are ignorant, naive, or insensitive. They may think that using abuse words is harmless, funny, or normal. They may not understand how their words can hurt others' feelings, damage their reputation, or cause trouble for themselves.

Using abuse words may seem cool or fun to some youngsters, but it can have serious consequences for them and others. Abuse words can:

- Harm their relationships. Using abuse words can make others feel disrespected, offended, or threatened. It can also make others lose trust, respect, or interest in them. This can affect their friendships, family ties, romantic prospects, or professional opportunities.
- Harm their self-image. Using abuse words can make them feel guilty, ashamed, or insecure. It can also make them internalize the negative messages that they say or hear from others. This can affect their self-esteem, self-confidence, or self-worth.
- Harm their mental health. Using abuse words can make them feel stressed, anxious, or depressed. It can also make them cope with their emotions in unhealthy ways, such as substance abuse, self-harm, or violence. This can affect their well-being, happiness, or safety.

If you are a youngster who uses abuse words frequently in public, you may want to reconsider your choice of words and find better ways to communicate with others. Here are some tips to help you:

- Think before you speak. Ask yourself why you want to use abuse words and what impact they will have on yourself and others. Is it worth it? Are there other ways to say what you mean without hurting anyone?
- Expand your vocabulary. Learn new and positive words that can express your thoughts and feelings more accurately and effectively. You can read books, watch shows, listen to podcasts, or play games that can enrich your language skills.
- Seek help if you need it. If you have trouble controlling your use of abuse words or dealing with your emotions, you may benefit from talking to someone who can support you and guide you. You can reach out to a trusted friend, family member, teacher, counselor, or therapist who can help you.

Using abuse words is not cool or smart; it is harmful and immature. You have the power and responsibility to choose your words wisely and respectfully. By doing so, you can improve your communication skills and your relationships with others.

Source

(1) The Enduring Pain of Childhood Verbal Abuse | Psychology Today. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/tech-support/201611/the-enduring-pain-childhood-verbal-abuse.
(2) 5 Reasons Why Parental Verbal Abuse Is Far More Damaging ... - WeHaveKids. https://wehavekids.com/parenting/Verbal-Abuse-Effects.
(3) What Is Verbal Abuse? 22 Examples, Patterns to Watch For ... - Healthline. https://www.healthline.com/health/mental-health/what-is-verbal-abuse.
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